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  2. "Despite lawsuits, the unpaid internship has come to seem like an inevitable fact of life. Some entry-level jobs, we hear, are too glamorous to pay. We learn that most young people, while eager, just aren’t prepared for the workforce. We are led to believe that the economy is still too weak to hire them; businesses want to pay, but budgets simply have no room.

    These three givens are actually myths, understandably embraced by employers, yet, more mysteriously, accepted as fact by the rest of us. So allow me to dispel them one by one.

    Phoebe Maltz Bovy, in The 3 big myths propping up unpaid internships

     


  3. 26%; 25%
    — 

    The percentage of survey respondents who have hooked up with exes over the holiday; and the percentage who think the best time to reveal secret feelings for a coworker is at a holiday party.  Yikes.

    Survey: ‘Tis the season for having sex with old flames and ruining your office reputation

     


  4. 50%-150%
    — 

    The potential increase in world economic activity from the free flow of workers across borders.

    How open immigration could double the global economy

     

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  7. fastcompany:

    It’s Monday. You’re probably trying to stay motivated. Here are a few tips that will help you be productive today:

    Have a great week!

     


  8. Yeah!
    — The word that gets you ahead at work, at least according to a new study from MIT.
     


  9. I am aware it is highly unusual for undergraduates from average universities like (BLOCKED) to intern at (BLOCKED), but nevertheless I was hoping you might make an exception. I am extremely interested in investment banking and would love nothing more than to learn under your tutelage. I have no qualms about fetching coffee, shining shoes or picking up laundry, and will work for next to nothing. In all honesty, I just want to be around professionals in the industry and gain as much knowledge as I can.

    I won’t waste your time inflating my credentials, throwing around exaggerated job titles, or feeding you a line of crapp (sic) about how my past experiences and skill set align perfectly for an investment banking internship. The truth is I have no unbelievably special skills or genius eccentricities, but I do have a near perfect GPA and will work hard for you.

    — 
    A young finance major looking for an internship wins over hotshot investment bankers by admitting in his cover letter that there’s nothing special about him.
     


  10. Only in America:

    Verizon claims to have caught an employee — “Bob” — outsourcing his daily coding duties to China so he could spend his time browsing Reddit, watching cat videos, and surfing eBay.

    (Source: theweek.com)

     

  11. Mitt Romney and President Obama went toe-to-toe on everything from Libya to taxes in Tuesday’s debate, but it was Romney’s comment about “binders full of women” that set the internet on fire. When asked about pay equity for women, Romney said that when he was governor of Massachusetts he went to women’s groups for help finding qualified female recruits for cabinet posts, and they gave him “binders full of women” qualified for the jobs. (See the video here.)

    Within seconds, the awkwardly phrased remark was everywhere online. There were “binders full of women” on Facebook and Tumblr. The domain names bindersfullofwomen.com (and .net) were snapped up, and Twitter was awash with #bindersfullofwomen quips. Romney caught up with Obama among women voters after the first debate, and the question offered him a chance to build even more momentum. Did he blow it?

    • This sexist remark should scare women voters: Mitt was trying “to prove he’s all about equal rights and pay,” says Maressa Brown at The Stir. Instead, his “condescending and sexist” insult about “binders full of women” shows how he “really feels about women.” He opposes the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act and wants employers to be free to deny people contraceptive coverage. Thanks, Mitt, for reminding us your policies “would be a horror show” for women. 
       
    • Overall, Romney likely won over some women: Romney’s comment was awkwardly phrased, but it was part of a description of “his effort to get more women in his cabinet,” a potential boost for his recent gains among women, says John D. McKinnon at The Wall Street Journal. Romney also made the case for greater flexibility in the workplace and pointed out that 3.5 million women have fallen into poverty under Obama. If you look at everything Romney said in the battle for women voters, the GOP challenger actually did “fairly well.”
       
    • Don’t overlook the worst part of Romney’s quip: Romney’s “binders full of women” blunder was bizarre — but it’s also “not a true story,” says David S. Bernstein at The Phoenix. Romney didn’t ask for help recruiting qualified women. Women’s groups were upset about a lack of women in government and put together the binders before he was elected, then gave them to him. Moreover, Romney was in business for 25 years but apparently “didn’t know any qualified women, or know where to find any qualified women. So what does that say?”
     

  12. While stress is an unfortunate and unhealthy part of modern life, going on a destructive rampage isn’t usually a socially acceptable way of dealing with it. Enter the Anger Room, an inconspicuous storefront in a Dallas strip mall where fed-up Americans can act out.

    Inside, proprietor and founder Donna Alexander and her staff offer up rooms of stuff — TVs, office furniture, glassware — for patrons to smash. 

    "Stuff that you can’t do to other people, you can do here," one customer says. "I can’t afford going to the psychiatrist, but I can afford this." 

    The ‘Anger Room’: The new way to blow off steam after work

     


  13. In this corporate ‘sink or swim’ environment, people fear being laid off or underperforming and being passed over for a promotion, thus they feel obliged to perpetually work, even while on vacation. We have begun to take on a level of subservience that is cringing. We fail to assert our need to take time off from fear of losing our jobs and our livelihood, in spite of the fact that doing so would be beneficial to us and to our employers in the long term.
    — 

    -Michael Janati, The Washington Post

    Is it time to cap the workweek at 40 hours?