1. It’s difficult to imagine that editors, curators, or gallery owners are consciously excluding women, but both Gallery Talley and VIDA’s counts show gender discrimination is as present as ever. There is an important discussion to be had about inequality in the culture industry and the industry should welcome it rather than defensively stick their heads in the sand.
     

  2. What do you think the opposite sex finds attractive in you? If you’re a guy, do you think that women prefer bulging muscles and washboard abs? Or, if you’re a woman, maybe you think men prefer skinny girls, like the ones we see on the catwalk? If so, you’re likely mistaken.

    Your assumptions about what the opposite sex finds attractive are probably wrong

     

  3. Finally! This middle school solved the problem of hormonal, distracted, adolescent boys.

    JK they just enacted sexist policies that shift the responsibility to the girls.

    Middle school girls banned from wearing leggings so boys can focus on school work

     


  4. But the fact is, there is no Platonic ideal of a feminist. It is near impossible to eschew everything and anything that can be linked to the patriarchy, and even if one could, it would be an identity so radical that it would be nearly impossible to sustain. There is just no perfect way to resist centuries upon centuries of male dominance and occasionally put on lipstick and a pair of heels. Or even have a kid, for that matter. The good news is that past generations of women didn’t have to be perfect feminists to elicit change, and neither do we.
     


  5. Medicare provides penis pumps at a cost of $360 a piece, which has never been debated once. Not once. Never.
     


  6. One hopes young women paying attention to Knox will choose not to campaign for ambiguous increases in freedom, but rather in targeted betterments in the arenas of life you can take to the bank: good and fair wages, health, and safety in the workplace. In the world of porn, none of those goods are on offer.
     


  7. Chelsea Handler’s comedic personality isn’t always easy to love; like Schumer’s and Sarah Silverman’s, it’s aggressive, raunchy, and thrives on shock value. Ultimately, though, these are all personas meant to undermine the cultural expectations we place on women’s speech. In this particular comedic performance, no one is proverbially safe and there’s little room for niceness.
     


  8. Bill O’Reilly’s segment from last Wednesday — the one in which he asks Kirsten Powers and Kate Obenshain to expound on some mysterious quality that makes women somehow less qualified than men to be president — has to be the most awkward moment of television.

    I sympathize with the urge to respond to the clip with mockery. But sometimes a glimmer of truth can be found even in the tawdriest of settings — and it’s Powers who deserves credit for uttering it here. Wracking her brain for something to say in response to O’Reilly’s flippantly sexist provocation, Powers volunteers that a female president might be more easily goaded than a male president into military muscle-flexing as a way of demonstrating her toughness.

    I like this comment not only because it undercuts O’Reilly’s smarmy insinuation that a woman would be too weak to stand toe-t-toe with macho tough guys like Vladimir Putin. I also like it because it may well be true.

     

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  10. "The obvious objection — that it’s presumptuous to assume women dress for men — doesn’t quite cover it. Many women do wear makeup and choose outfits in part to look more attractive to certain men. But rare is the woman who seeks to attract absolutely all men, or even as many men as possible. As Laurie Penny notes regarding her own short hair, a woman’s beauty choices can effectively sort through the men a woman attracts, eliminating those a she wouldn’t be interested in to begin with."

    — Phoebe Maltz Bovy in, Why are so many men trolling beauty sites?

     


  11. Feminists who oppose name-change — and not all do — tend to assume that name-changers know, deep down, that they’re doing something terrible

    We get bogged down in ‘choice feminism’ discussions — can a woman ever choose the option that’s consistent with what’s expected of her? The same comes up regarding use of makeup. Given the pressure on women to wear the stuff, can a woman ever choose to do so? The ‘choice feminism’ conversation makes sense regarding substantive life decisions, but is far weaker regarding symbolic ones.

     

  12. Monica Bartyzel, in Girls on Film:

    Frozen only vilifies the Prince Charming fantasy as it currently stands: The idea that Prince Charming can be recognized in a moment, and that true love can come from a single kiss on dead lips or a perfectly sized shoe. In Frozen, Kristoff is the one because he falls in love with the girl he’s taken the time to know — for her attitude and resourcefulness, and for her spirit and candor. If Kristoff offers her passionate, respectful, and reciprocal love, how can Hans’ villainous twist shame girls’ fantasies? The fantasy remains, but in a more worthwhile form.

    How Frozen killed Prince Charming

     


  13. A powerful podcast on how we define “manliness” in the internet age.

    Read more on Amanda Hess and how women journalists are treated online.

    Subscribe and listen to all of The Week’s mini-podcasts here.