1. This is a story that is not at all unfamiliar for women working in tech. In fact, it almost feels like the status quo. Wolfe was treated with repeated casual misogyny in the workplace, no one helped her when she asked for assistance, and she was also confronting ageism and the notion that a young, confident woman couldn’t possibly be an important part of a company. When she fought back aggressively, she was fired.
    — 

    The truth about tech’s sexism problem is even worse than you think

    While the industry may represent a pinnacle of sexism, it wasn’t created in a vacuum

     

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  3. A new generation of adult toys take cyber sex to a whole new level. These devices — called teledildonics — are manipulatable by the actions of a far-away internet partner.

    Sex toys get social

     

  4. “If you were to sit down with the “internet” — it would be a messy-haired, foul-mouthed, aggressive, and impatient radical. The unimpeachable androgyne would attack you on subjects ranging from feminism to modern-day fascism. It’d know everything there is to know and be useless at dispensing the information. And if it had to assume a cultural identity, it would have to be Japanese.” — Jack Flanagan, in How Japan won the internet

     


  5. How did we forget what we already knew? Why did Renaissance men feel able to indulge in off-topic hobbies that round off our core skills, but we don’t? Perhaps in these years of the quantified self, if it isn’t backed by science or quoted atop a noir-gif of Mark Zuckerberg then it doesn’t make sense to us.
    — Jack Flanagan, in Where are all the renaissance men?
     


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  7. Astronauts, marathoners, and smartphone users (read: everyone) say “Thanks, technology!”

    Listen to all of The Week’s mini-podcasts here.

     

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  9. This Internet Explorer ad features Microsoft’s new anime mascot fighting…um…malware? Or something? 

     


  10. yak shaving
    — 

    Tedious tasks that must be done before productive work can begin, or useless activity one engages in to avoid real work.

    Our favorite hacker slang

     

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  12. iOS 7’s most important new feature

    In spring 2012, a talented young New York City chef named Hwangbum Yang, 26, was headed uptown after a typically long shift at The Modern — a trendy restaurant tucked away in a Manhattan art museum. A Sunday school teacher and son of immigrant parents, Yang dreamed of one day returning to Korea after making a name for himself as a premier chef in the big city.

    That night, however, his dream of making his parents proud was abruptly cut short. About two blocks away from his apartment in the Riverdale section of the Bronx, a twenty-something in a grey hoodie stopped in front of Yang and fired a single shot straight into his chest. According to an eyewitness, the thief then kicked over Yang’s body, quickly rummaged through his pockets, and took his iPhone. A wallet full of cash was left behind.

    Police later found the budding chef’s phone on Craigslist. The asking price? $400.

    A look at iOS 7’s kill switch.

     


  13. Good question.