1. Though reports of a pending ObamaCare death spiral — in which not enough young people sign up and cause the market to implode — appear to have been greatly exaggerated, ObamaCare supporters at the state and federal level are making a concerted push to attract this crucial demographic.

    So how do you market ObamaCare to millennials? Here are 11 attempts.

     

  2. Does this handful of horse pills resemble your daily cocktail of vitamin supplements?  

    Sorry to tell you, but they’re useless.

    How the vitamin-industrial complex swindled America

     


  3. The old rule that a guy has to spend 2 months’ salary on an engagement ring?

    Yeah, a marketing team made that up.

    Listen to all of The Week’s mini-podcasts here.

     

  4. Tip and Tap (West Germany, 1974):

    Pros: Two doofy, chipped-tooth, red-faced dudes.

    Cons: Midriff shirts.

    All the World Cup mascots, ranked

     


  5. For millennials, your bread is your signature. Millennials need to have something that says who they are — uniquely them. The more unique the better — hold the raisins.
     

  6. This Internet Explorer ad features Microsoft’s new anime mascot fighting…um…malware? Or something? 

     

  7. Harold and Kumar go to…Jack in the Box?

     

  8. What years of marketing, messaging, and speechifying couldn’t accomplish, kitties just might.

    Can adorable animals boost Obamacare?

     

  9. Hershey’s Reese’s Pieces saw a reported 65% jump in profits after being featured in the film E.T. as the candy Elliott uses to lure his new friend into his house. 

    Here, the stories behind 10 famous product placements

    PHOTO: YouTube

    (Source: theweek.com)

     

  10. Finally, a laptop pretty enough to entice women into using it! The ”Floral Kiss” laptop ”features a flip latch that can easily open the display — even by users with long fingernails.” It comes daintily adorned with gold and pearl designs, scrapbooking software and daily horoscopes. The whole thing is “insulting,” says Jenna Sauers at Jezebel — just like these 6 equally patronizing products designed for the ladies

     

  11. The NFL had $9.5 billion in revenue in 2011, and they’ve donated a paltry $3 million to breast cancer? Pardon me while I don’t slobber all over the NFL’s pink-drenched marketing campaign.” -Erin Gloria Ryan at Jezebel

    The NFL is coming under fire in the wake of a new report that accuses the NFL of profiting from the cause, arguing that most of the money from the breast cancer awareness push “ends up in the pockets of billionaire NFL owners.” The NFL refutes that claim. What exactly does the NFL’s breast cancer campaign do in terms of raising money and raising awareness? 

    Is the NFL’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month a scam?

     

  12. Top: Mattel’s affectionately dubbed “Drag Queen” Barbie was made to resemble her cross-dressing designer, Phillipe Blond. She comes complete with a mini dress, a full-length faux fur, and a heavily made up face. “I can already hear the complaints” about this being “an abomination,” says Michele Zipp at The Stir. “Don’t like it? Don’t buy it.

    Bottom: Mattel and Nabisco thought they hit marketing gold when they paired America’s favorite doll with its favorite cookie in 1994. Selling in both grocery stores and toy stores, the Caucasian Oreo fun Barbie doll flew off the shelves. When Mattel introduced a black version, it was clear that the company hadn’t given much thought to the fact that the word Oreo can be derogatory — it’s used to describe blacks who are accused of being sellouts to the race.

    10 controversial Barbies (Featuring Pregnant Barbie, Busty Barbie and others)
     

  13. When junk email became known as “spam,” Spam the pork-esque product faced “the greatest marketing challenge in its 75-year history.” Eventually, Spam embraced its inner punchline, rolling out an ad campaign with tag lines like “Glorious Spam!” and a mascot called Sir Can-a-Lot.

    Result: Spam has thrived. Here, 7 other dramatic rebranding campaigns