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  3. Sunnie Kahle has short hair. She enjoys wearing sneakers and playing sports. She also “cries when she comes home because she wants to go back to Timberlake Christian [School] with her friends.” 

    8-year-old girl removed from school because she isn’t feminine enough

     

  4. Finally! This middle school solved the problem of hormonal, distracted, adolescent boys.

    JK they just enacted sexist policies that shift the responsibility to the girls.

    Middle school girls banned from wearing leggings so boys can focus on school work

     

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  6. (NATE BEELER Copyright 2014 Cagle Cartoons)

    The week’s best editorial cartoons

     

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  8. Megan McArdle has been pushing the importance of failure, and bemoaning cultural shifts away from taking failure-prone risks. In her estimation, children are being drilled into total conformity from a young age, steered by overly concerned parents toward high-success paths that leave little room for creative deviations from the norm. In the long run, McArdle suggests, this is bad for society because it will reduce innovation and the social benefits that flow from it.

    But while McCardle somewhat glibly celebrates failure, the reality of deep failure in America is stark. Unlike elsewhere in the developed world, being at or near the bottom of American society entails extraordinary misery. Poverty, food insecurity, homelessness, instability, and a general lack of a livable social floor means that the consequences of truly failing in the U.S. are rather horrific.

    — Matt Bruenig, in If you want kids to fail, stop making failure so horrible

     


  9. Should public schools teach the gay rights and civil rights movements as parallel narratives? That all moral criticisms of homosexuality are motivated by irrational animus? That virtually the whole of the Judeo-Christian tradition is homophobic? That the Roman Catholic Church, which continues to describe homosexual acts as “objectively disordered,” is the moral equivalent of a hate group?
     


  10. Basically, America is separating into aristocrats and peasants.

    On one hand you have an upper-middle class and upper class who go to good colleges and have skilled jobs. These people tend to have healthy family values — they get married and stay married, they pay a lot of attention to their kids. They are civically engaged and physically healthy. On the other hand you have uneducated masses, who tend not to stay married, to leave child-raising to single mothers, and to neglect the kids. They are overweight, bedraggled, and disengaged from the community.

     


  11. At the loftiest heights of the income pyramid, American meritocracy is broken, replaced by the shameful self-dealing of the superrich.

    All of us recognize the way the breakdown in meritocracy is playing itself out closer to the middle class. In theory, capitalism provides equal opportunities to every individual, allowing him or her to use innate talent and ambition, combined with more than a dash of luck, to achieve economic success. Also in theory, economic failure is supposed to be justly earned, a product of a deficiency of talent, ambition, and luck.

    The reality, of course, is very different — and becoming more so with every passing year. We start out our lives profoundly unequal. Some Americans grow up impoverished, attending chaotic, academically worthless schools, and exposed to an enormous range of social and cultural obstacles to achievement both at home and in the local environment. Others, by contrast, receive a world-class education at school, continual emotional and scholastic support at home, access to tutors, test-prep, and even pharmaceuticals to compensate for a range of cognitive and behavioral deficits.

     


  12. With two million American kids suspended or expelled from junior and high schools each year, the Obama administration decided to figure out what the heck is going in America’s classrooms. The results of the investigation weren’t pretty: Discriminatory policies that push students of color, and those with disabilities, out of the U.S. education system.
     

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