1. The American fight for equality began with distinct Christian precepts

    Read more on this story here.

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  2. Should public schools teach the gay rights and civil rights movements as parallel narratives? That all moral criticisms of homosexuality are motivated by irrational animus? That virtually the whole of the Judeo-Christian tradition is homophobic? That the Roman Catholic Church, which continues to describe homosexual acts as “objectively disordered,” is the moral equivalent of a hate group?
     


  3. The Cheneys’ biggest problem right now?  A family feud.

    The GOP’s biggest problem with the Cheneys?  This chart:

    Why the Cheneys’ gay marriage feud could burn the GOP

     

  4. 50 years ago today, 250,000 marched on Washington to demand civil rights. More photos here.

     

  5. Pakistani students pray for the recovery of 14-year-old Malala Yousafzai, who was shot on Oct. 9 by the Taliban in Peshawar, Pakistan, for speaking out in support of education for women. The young girl remains in critical condition at a military hospital and officials have reportedly arrested suspects in connection with the attack. 

    Photo: AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad

     


  6. Will Mississippi become the first state without an abortion clinic?

    A federal judge has temporarily blocked a law that would shut down Mississippi’s only remaining abortion clinic. But after that, it’s anyone’s guess what Judge Daniel P. Jordan will decide.

    Is Mississippi about to make any woman who wants an abortion drive 200 miles to a different state, or to an unsafe back-alley type abortionist?

    Keep reading

     

  7.  ”I live in the mountains and I want to keep them beautiful,” says the KKK group’s secretary, April Chambers. "I don’t know why anybody’s offended by it."

    Georgia’s Department of Transportation needs all the help it can get. But even in this era of budget crunches, the Peach State’s transportation department isn’t sure it wants help from the Ku Klux Klan, which recently applied to keep a mile of northern Georgia’s Route 515 clean through the state’s “Adopt-a-Highway” program.

    "This is simply another attempt by the Klan to somehow portray itself as a kinder, gentler group rather than the terrorist organization that it has historically been," says Mark Potok at the Southern Poverty Law Center. 

    Can Georgia legally stop the KKK from adopting a highway? 

    (Source: theweek.com)

     


  8. All sarcasm aside, it’s an extremely sad night for all families in North Carolina. It’s not just families headed by or including lesbian, gay or bisexual members who will be hurt. A real blow has been dealt to their legal options for protection and support, it’s true. But all North Carolinians — in living with a constitution which legalizes discrimination, and which creates two sets of rights for two sets of citizens — are hurt in the cycle of a false notion of superiority and inferiority. Pro-equality Fortune 500 companies will be less likely to settle there, hurting the economic options for totally gay and totally straight North Carolinians alike. And they’ll be hurt for at least a generation, if not generations, with this constitutional amendment.
    — 

    Steven Thrasher at The Village Voice

    North Carolina voters overwhelmingly approved a constitutional amendment on Tuesday that makes marriage between a man and a woman the only kind of union recognized by the state.

    Here a look at what the vote means for the state and the country

     


  9. …and tells the Weekly Standard that growing up in Yazoo City, Miss. during the civil rights revolution wasn’t that bad.

    Barbour’s spokesman says critics are using his comments to unfairly “paint the governor as a racist.”

    This “whitewashing” of Southern racism is Barbour’s version of Nixon’s “Southern Strategy,” says Heather “Digby” Parton in Hullabaloo, and it’s a “clever” one. This would-be presidential candidate knows who votes in GOP primaries, and his implicit pitch here — that “racism in America was always overblown” and “those who complain about it have always been whiners” — is the type of revisionist “dogwhistle” he’ll need to beat Sarah Palin.

    More reaction and analysis here