1. While not intentional or planned — or even something I would have chosen — formula-feeding helped us create egalitarian habits that remain with us today. I’m not saying I live in an equal parenting paradise, but bringing in formula nudged us much closer to 50/50, domestically and professionally, than we would have landed otherwise.
    — 

    How formula-feeding made my husband a better father

    Breast is best — except for equal parenting

     


  2. When you have a developmentally disabled child, a part of you does not want them to grow up. Watching their body outgrow their mind and ability to reason brings with it a terror all its own. You want to push the pause button — or better yet, hit rewind.
    — 

    When your special needs child becomes a special needs teen

    My daughter’s body is changing. But inside, she remains a child.

     

  3. Orphaned children and the abandoned dogs they love

    In Bangladesh, an Australian photographer finds a tight-knit, motley family

     


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  5. Take a look at this week’s cover, featuring Hillary Clinton’s inevitable run at the presidency.

     

  6. 7 photos: Reaching through light

    Photographer Micaela Walker uses her lens to brighten young lives

     

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  9. Sunnie Kahle has short hair. She enjoys wearing sneakers and playing sports. She also “cries when she comes home because she wants to go back to Timberlake Christian [School] with her friends.” 

    8-year-old girl removed from school because she isn’t feminine enough

     


  10. Megan McArdle has been pushing the importance of failure, and bemoaning cultural shifts away from taking failure-prone risks. In her estimation, children are being drilled into total conformity from a young age, steered by overly concerned parents toward high-success paths that leave little room for creative deviations from the norm. In the long run, McArdle suggests, this is bad for society because it will reduce innovation and the social benefits that flow from it.

    But while McCardle somewhat glibly celebrates failure, the reality of deep failure in America is stark. Unlike elsewhere in the developed world, being at or near the bottom of American society entails extraordinary misery. Poverty, food insecurity, homelessness, instability, and a general lack of a livable social floor means that the consequences of truly failing in the U.S. are rather horrific.

    — Matt Bruenig, in If you want kids to fail, stop making failure so horrible

     


  11. Kermit the frog can be a real jerk.

    Watch all of the Sesame Street clips mentioned in the podcast.

    Subscribe and listen to all of The Week’s mini-podcasts here.

     


  12. Hikikomori
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    Japanese teens and young men known as shut-ins, who eschew human contact and spend their days playing video games and reading comics in their parents’ homes.  There are an estimated 1 million hikikomori in Japan, contributing to a worrisome drop in the Japanese population.

    Everything you need to know about Japan’s population crisis

     


  13. In our weekly podcast series “This Week I Learned”: Science helps you guard against the Polar Vortex; seeing sound onscreen; every kid gets amnesia; and Richard Pryor’s gorgeous hidden talent.

    Listen to all of our “This Week I Learned” podcasts (and many more) here.