1. 7 ideas from ancient thinkers that will improve your modern life

    Science has validated many of the lessons ancient thinkers knew but could not prove

     

  2. Last month, Wired did a study of dating profiles with the help of OkCupid and Match.com in order to assemble some tips on writing the perfect profile. Here are 7 things they discovered from crunching the numbers on the words people use in their dating profiles

    Spoiler: writing “whom” is hot, “God” not so much.

     

  3. "Marriage isn’t a lovey-dovey thing, y’know, for 80 years.  You learn to accept one another’s way of life.”

    Relationship advice from America’s longest-married couple

     


  4. I always have to know my characters in a lot of depth — what clothes they’d choose, what they were like at school, etc. And I know what happened before and what will happen after the part of their lives I’m dealing with. I can’t see them just now, packed into the stress of the moment.
     


  5. Need advice?

    TheWeek.com's resident sage and advice columnist, Starshine Roshell, can help you out! Send questions on love, life, or whatever else is troubling you to: ToughLove@TheWeek.com

     

  6. Are you grappling with sticky, not-so-easy-to-answer problems in your relationship? TheWeek.com’s wonderful advice columnist, Starshine Roshell, might be able to give you some Tough Love.

    What do you need help with?

     


  7. Sexual experience is overrated. You’ll have to take my word for this, but plain old frantic, fumbling, basic-biology intercourse feels crazy, ungodly good, so you don’t get a ton of bonus points for having “moves” or encyclopedic nudity know-how.
     


  8. Dear Starshine,

    My ex and I recently got back together after trying to be apart for a while. We had some disagreements during the getting-back-together phase and one evening I decided to go out drinking with friends. Long story short, I had way too much to drink and all I remember is waking up the next morning. Friends told me about the hilarious things I did that I have no memory of. A very dear friend of mine told me that I kissed him and he was too drunk to stop me. It must have lasted a couple of minutes at most. I have absolutely no recollection of this but I have no reason to doubt my friend’s story either. Apart from vowing to never binge drink again, I’m in a bind: Should I tell my boyfriend or should I pretend it never happened?

    Oh, sweetie, tell him about the kiss or don’t tell him. It doesn’t matter. He’s going to find out either way because — Can I be honest? — you’re a bad liar…

     

  9. Dear Abby: My boyfriend is going to be 20 years old next month. I’d like to give him something nice for his birthday. What do you think he’d like? —Carol
    Dear Carol: Nevermind what he’d like, give him a tie.

    Dear Abby: Our son married a girl when he was in the service. They were married in February and she had an 8 1/2-pound baby girl in August. She said the baby was premature. Can an 8 1/2-pound baby be this premature? —Wanting to Know
    Dear Wanting: The baby was on time. The wedding was late. Forget it. 

    Here, 13 of Dear Abby’s best zingers.

     

  10. Advice to live by: “Condoms can reduce the spread of STDs, but ain’t no prophylactic can staunch the spread of lies.”

    Our new advice columnist, Starshine Roshell, is kicking things off today at TheWeek.com. Her first (really tough) question: How do I tell my crush I have herpes?

     


  11. If the next Republican nominee pushes a platform that includes comprehensive immigration reform, including some form of legalization mechanism for current undocumented immigrants, then the party has a good chance of picking away a large number of Hispanics from the Democratic Party. The party could take the teeth out of the immigration issue entirely by compromising with President Obama on immigration during the next term.
    — 

    Marc Ambinder has some advice for the GOP

    What Republicans need to do now

     


  12. Tips for making sense of the 2012 poll overload

    Two weeks ago, President Obama was crushing Republican challenger Mitt Romney in the polls. Then Romney graduated from likely to presumptive GOP nominee, Gallup started its general-election tracking poll, and suddenly Romney was up by two percentage points… even as a CNN poll still had Obama up by nine. Other polls showed Romney winning big among white males, but losing the female and Latino vote. And just about every day, political junkies are greeted by a flurry of new polls — often contradicting the surveys that were hyped mere hours or days earlier. As the polls come fast and furious, it’s a lot to take in. Here, some tips on how to make sense of the numbers:

    1. Don’t obsess about any one poll
    Instead of getting upset (or elated) about a poll’s findings, remember that no one poll means very much by itself, says Ezra Klein at The Washington Post. And “individual polls that show unusual results are almost always wrong.” You want to watch the averages of several polls, as compiled at places like RealClearPolitics or Pollster.com. If a poll looks like an outlier, it probably is. Also keep in mind, says Mark Blumenthal at The Huffington Post, that “in late October, polls will be highly predictive of the outcome,” but 200 days out, they’re no more predictive than a coin toss.

    2. Ignore state polls — even for swing states
    "Given how unreliable national polls are this early," the polls of individual states are completely worthless, says Jonathan Bernstein at A Plain Blog About Politics. ”Really: Ignore state polls,” and ignore speculation about electoral-college math, at least until Labor Day. Your best bet is still the national averages. “Why? Because generally, swings are national, not local, in nature,” and the candidate who wins the popular vote almost always wins the electoral college.

    3. Be aware of who’s being polled
    "It is worth looking at whether the poll is conducted among registered voters, likely voters, or all adults," says Nate Silver at The New York Times. In the past eight presidential elections, Republicans have done better in polls of likely voters that registered ones — about 2 percentage points better — and that’s “probably not simply a statistical fluke.” The groups that vote Republican, like older and wealthier voters, also tend to vote more reliably.

    More tips here