1. On this day in 1970, President Nixon signed a bill limiting cigarette advertisements on TV and radio. Nixon, who was an avid pipe smoker, indulging in as many as eight bowls a day, supported the legislation at the urging of public health advocates. There had been warnings about the dangers of smoking as far back as 1939, and by the end of the 1950s, all states had laws banning the sale of cigarettes to minors. In 1964, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) agreed that advertisers had a responsibility to warn the public of the health hazards of cigarette smoking.

    Here’s what else happened on this day in history

     

  2. On this day in 1969: As the Vietnam War raged, President Richard Nixon ordered the bombing of neighboring Cambodia for the first time. Nixon believed Cambodia was being used as a staging area for attacks on American forces; the bombings were kept secret for two months and continued through April 1970. A total of 3,630 sorties dropped 110,000 tons of ordnance.

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  3. On this day in 1972: In what was arguably the most dramatic trip ever taken by a president of the United States, Richard Nixon arrived in China for an eight-day visit. The announcement that Nixon, a lifelong hardline anti-communist, would visit China stunned the world. The United States and China had been foes for a quarter-century, but Nixon recognized the need for better ties — which would also help the U.S. in its Cold War standoff with the Soviet Union. During his week-long visit, Nixon met with Mao and Zhou En-Lai; it is seen today as the beginning of China’s drive to modernize and enter the modern world. China’s economy is now the world’s second largest, trailing only that of the U.S itself. Nixon called it “the week that changed the world,” and the phrase “Nixon going to China” has since become a metaphor for an unexpected or uncharacteristic action by a politician.

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  4. "Let’s go for a long ride Sunday; let’s go to the mountains weekends. Let’s read books in front of fires; most of all, let’s really grow together and find the happiness we know is ours."

    Decades before Richard Nixon resigned the presidency in disgrace, he was just another love-struck young man. Here, the most interesting revelations from Nixon’s love letters

    (Source: theweek.com)