1. Confronting our twisted relationship with food

    A young photographer turns the stories of women with eating disorders into searingly thought-provoking images

     


  2. After controlling for how well students had actually done on the first two tasks, Lee and colleagues found that single-sex schools didn’t increase girls’ competitiveness — if anything, it magnified the gender gap.
     

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  7. After spending all of February recommending Valentine’s Day-friendly love stories, we’ll be recommending a movie that will make you think twice about romance for each week in the month of March. This week, a double-feature of Alex Karpovsky movies: The unnerving thriller Rubberneck and the quirky, navel-gazing comedy Red Flag.

    Alex Karpovsky is most famous for his supporting role as Ray on HBO’s Girls. But Karpovsky is an accomplished filmmaker in his own right, and the best example of his talent and range comes with a pair of his films released as a double feature in 2013: Rubberneck and Red Flag, in which Karpovsky serves as writer, director, and star.

    Watch trailers for these films here.

    Subscribe and listen to all of The Week’s mini-podcasts on SoundCloud hereand on iTunes here.

     

  8. Could your Tumblr win a book deal? 

    The book publishing industry, a notorious slouch when it comes to emerging trends on the internet, is not going to let this Tumblr thing come and go without earning a buck or two. 

     

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  10. Last night’s episode of Girls was yet another round in what has become a competition to see who can be the show’s most sociopathically unlikable character, as the girls in Lena Dunham’s HBO dramedy grappled with the untimely passing of Hannah’s editor.

    Hannah, in predictable fashion, uses the death as an opportunity to get attention, while admitting the only real remorse she feels is for the unclear future of her e-book. Jessa and Shoshana share stories about their own experiences with death, with Shosh conceding that it was ultimately a good thing for her high school clique, and Jessa getting so involved in her own story that she forgot Shoshana’s altogether. Marnie continues in her tireless efforts to become the kind of girl “fancy people want to work with,” and then Hannah, Laird, and Caroline cart-wheel through a cemetery.

    In other words, it was the usual display of self-involved delusion and tragically poor communication that has become a hallmark of the series. After each episode since the conclusion of the brilliant first season, I’ve asked myself: Why do I continue watching this show? Is it because the whole series has become such a spectacle? Am I challenging myself to white-knuckle through one uncomfortable scene after the next? Is it because as a twenty-something writer living in New York I’d feel totally irrelevant not watching it?

    No, I realized, it’s because of the boys.

    — Monica Nickelsburg, in Why I only watch Girls for the guys

     


  11. Patrick, Agustin, and Dom have partners of various ethnicities, ages, and social groups. They discuss politics or social issues in passing, just like the rest of us. They don’t exist to teach us lessons or preach about gay rights, nor to incessantly navel-gaze about their problems. They’re just three regular guys who happen to like guys. In 2014, that’s (sadly) still remarkable.
     


  12. It’s because it’s a realistic expression of what it’s like to be alive, I think, and I totally get it. If you are not into me, that’s your problem.
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    Lena Dunham, answering a critic who “doesn’t get” why she’s “naked, at random times, for no reason” so often on Girls.

    Lena Dunham’s body reveals the naked truth about our distorted values

     


  13. The success of The Hunger Games meant that [Jennifer] Lawrence said goodbye to her old life — which allowed her to disappear into roles in films like Winter’s Bone — and embraced life in the spotlight. Thus far, celebrity has been ridiculously kind to Lawrence. Far and wide, people tweet wishes to be her BFF, or pit her against actresses who have fallen out of favor. Her every stumble or statement is fawned over. But the adoration hints at the backlash that will inevitably come when her very human actions fail to live up to the superhuman expectations thrust upon her.